CLASSICS

Say not, poor Christian, “It is impossible to bear this affliction, or pass that temptation.” Let faith follow the promise, and God will loose these knots that sense and reason tie. Luther bids, crucifige illud verbum, quare? [or] Crucify that word, wherefore? Obey the command, and ask not a reason why God enjoins it. It is as necessary to bid the Christian, in great afflictions and temptations, to crucify the word quomodo? [which means] How shall I go through this trouble, hold out in that assault?

Away with this “How shall I?” Hath not the great God who is faithful given thee promises enough to ease thy heart of these needless fears and cares, in that He tells thee, “He will never leave thee nor forsake thee, His grace shall be sufficient for thee”? Nothing “shall separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” And a hundred more as comfortable assurances from the lip of truth to stand betwixt thee and all harm. Why then dost thou trouble thyself about this improbability and that mountainous difficulty that sense and carnal reason heave up and interpose to eclipse thy comfort from thy approaching deliverance?

“Shut the windows, and the house will be light,” as the Jewish proverb saith. Judge not by sense, but by faith in an omnipotent God; and these bugbears will not scare thee.

Let faith follow the promise, and God will loose these knots that sense and reason tie.

The Christian in Complete Armor, 1865

By William Gurnall